How does a waterlock muffler work

Email nemo abcpm. Vetus offer a comprehensive range of exhaust system components, including waterlocks, mufflers and goosenecks. These are all suitable for wet exhaust systems and act to prevent water from running back along the system and into the engine.

We recommend that all exhaust systems are fitted with a high temperature alarm in order to provide a warning of potential problems.

When an engine is installed relatively high compared to the vessel's waterline, the installation of the exhaust system may be done without modification to the engine, as long as the water injection point on the injection bend from the exhaust manifold is at least 15cm 6 inches above the waterline.

The waterlock should be installed at the lowest point of the exhaust system a minimum of 30cm from the injection point in order to allow it to collect any water that is left in the exhaust system once the engine is switched off. Ideally, a gooseneck should be installed at the transom connector, otherwise the exhaust hose should be looped up as high as possible to prevent water from entering the boat in a following sea or due to engine suction.

If required, a muffler may be fitted between the waterlock and the gooseneck. If an engine is installed relatively low compared to the vessel's waterline, ie with the water injection point engine's exhaust less than leat 15cm 6 inches above the waterline, then an aivent should be fitted to avoid syphoning. As before, the waterlock should be installed at the lowest point of the exhaust system a minimum of 30cm from the injection point. Again, a gooseneck should be installed at the transom connector, otherwise the exhaust hose should be looped up as high as possible to prevent water from entering the boat in a following sea or due to engine suction.

A waterlock collects the cooling water present in the exhaust system when the engine has stopped, helping to prevent water ingress into the engine. The size of the waterlock should be determined by not only the size of the exhaust hose, but also by the length of the exhast system, hence Vetus offers waterlocks with extra capacity to suit installations with long exhaust runs. Vetus NLP and MG waterlocks are of dual stage construction, featuring upper and lower chambers with a horizontal partition plate and a riser tube through the centre.

Compared with single stage waterlocks with one chamber, these waterlocks offer superior silencing of exhaust noise with minimal back pressure. Since the top chamber may be rotated through degrees, installation of the exhaust system even in confined spaces is greatly simplified. A gooseneck raises the exhaust hose above the waterline, so that water cannot easily backfill the exhaust system, both by providing additional height that the water must climb, but also additional volume compared to a loop of exhaust hose.

The gooseneck can be fitted directly onto a Vetus rubber transom connector, saving space in an often constricted place. The Vetus muffler provides a useful function in reducing the noise of the engine that escapes through the exhaust system.

The construction causes very little resistance to the free flow of exhaust gasses. Some marine diesel engines and in particular generator sets can produce a gurgling exhaust noise. We are able to supply the entire range of Vetus components to complete an exhaust installation. Several different models of transom connector, including a rubber version intended for direct connection to the gooseneck to optimise installation space at the transom.

To complete the job, an exhaust temperature alarm may also be fitted, that will provide an alert if an overheat problem occurs.

Note: all specifications are subject to change without notice. Please contact us for details of prices and any further information, full details are available in the current Vetus catalogue which you can request online. Installation with engine high When an engine is installed relatively high compared to the vessel's waterline, the installation of the exhaust system may be done without modification to the engine, as long as the water injection point on the injection bend from the exhaust manifold is at least 15cm 6 inches above the waterline.

Installation with engine low If an engine is installed relatively low compared to the vessel's waterline, ie with the water injection point engine's exhaust less than leat 15cm 6 inches above the waterline, then an aivent should be fitted to avoid syphoning. Single-stage waterlocks A waterlock collects the cooling water present in the exhaust system when the engine has stopped, helping to prevent water ingress into the engine.

Provided with a drain plug for winter storage. Dimensions: mm long x 90mm wide x mm high. Capacity: 2. Provided with a plug for draining over winter. The inlet connection of this waterlock will rotate through degrees, which greatly facilitates the installation of the exhuaust assembly. Dimensions: mm long x mm wide x mm high.

Capacity: 4.An engine exhaust waterlock for water injection cooled engines which collects the cooling water that is present in the exhaust system and provides exhaust noise reduction.

The Vetus Type LP Waterlock is an engine exhaust waterlock for water injection cooled engines which collects the cooling water that is present in the exhaust system while the engine is stopped and also provides exhaust noise reduction.

By installing the marine exhaust waterlock it uses the density of the engine cooling water to 'absorb' the sound waves which are produced as a result of the exhaust gas flow.

It also holds the exhaust cooling water that is present when the engine is stopped. It also helps to prevent water, on the outside of the boat, entering into the exhaust system and therefore the engine through the transome fitting.

how does a waterlock muffler work

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Mufflers and Waterlocks

Vetus Type LP Waterlock with Rotating Inlet An engine exhaust waterlock for water injection cooled engines which collects the cooling water that is present in the exhaust system and provides exhaust noise reduction.

Add to your basket Vetus Type LP Waterlock with Rotating Inlet Information The Vetus Type LP Waterlock is an engine exhaust waterlock for water injection cooled engines which collects the cooling water that is present in the exhaust system while the engine is stopped and also provides exhaust noise reduction. Why install an exhaust waterlock?

You may also like Compact Rubber Exhaust Mufflers. Keep in Touch with Sheridan Marine Name. Email Address.Take the exhaust mixing elbow, for example—and give yourself a pat on the back for actually knowing what it is.

And another for caring about what it does. What it is, basically, is a well-concealed problem spot on marine diesel engines. The year-old elbow was showing signs of corrosion.

A marine diesel has one of two types of mixing elbow, depending on how high in the boat it is installed. A low-rise elbow curves downward from the exhaust manifold. A U-shaped high-rise elbow is usually seen on sailboats, where engines are typically located partly or entirely below the waterline. These are annoying things that tend to clog up and need constant inspection.

And as long as the exhaust line is looped above the point at where it exits the hull, there is virtually no danger of water siphoning back into the system. Such an exhaust system needs little attention except for those dratted siphon breaks and will last a very long time—except for the exhaust mixing elbow. I also noticed spots of rust bleeding through from the inside of the elbow casting, and telltale bubbles where the exhaust hose connected to the elbow—indicating that gas and water had been leaking out.

It was time to act. Mixing elbows are considered a consumable item, like oil filters and alternator drive belts. Both the water-cooling inlet and the exhaust passage tend to clog up, the former with scale and salt deposits, the latter with carbon and soot.

Waterlock Mufflers

The corrosive gases eventually eat away at the cast iron, and cracks and pinhole leaks can develop. Removing the exhaust hose from the mixing elbow was challenging.

Depending on the state of the elbow, it may be possible to remove part of the blockage by soaking the elbow in muriatic acid or taking it to a radiator shop.

This is probably a false economy, but it may buy you another year or two. So I got out the toolbox and set to work.

how does a waterlock muffler work

The four bolts connecting the riser to the manifold came out easily enough, but it proved impossible to separate the exhaust hose from the mixing elbow. I had to cut it off, a procedure that involved a sharp knife, a hacksaw and some inventive cursing—the latter because I would now have to replace the hose. The riser looked fine, with little buildup of hard soot, but the mixing elbow looked horrible, with heavy carbon buildup visible as far as I could see.

A healthy glob of high-temperature exhaust sealant was applied to the threads, and the assembly was left overnight to dry. It had set rock hard by the morning. The connector and elbow were reluctant to separate despite twice-daily doses of penetrating oil. Reassembly was the easy part. I scraped the remnants of the old gasket off the riser and the exhaust manifold with a razor blade, applied a little anti-seize compound to the four bolts, put the new gasket in place, and bolted on the elbow assembly.

I should have tried harder to get the hose off the old elbow. Still and all, it was an easy if rather dirty project, and the engine is happier for it. It is revving higher and the water flow from its exhaust is again strong.

This yacht brings with it a level of performance and head turning good looks that will certainly capture the attention of yachtsmen and women around the world. This luxurious yacht is loaded with conveniences that make The X-Yachts X4.

Flowmaster Exhaust Technology Explained - Laminar Flow Technology 101

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Join Now. Recent Photos. I have a stainless steel waterlock which looks like just a vertical cylinder about 10 inches tall and 10 inches high. After two efforts to cure its leak by getting it rewelded, it is no better, it leaks slightly at the lower weld. The off-the-shelf versions are either too small ie smaller than the one I have I am not sure how you are supposed to work out how much water they should hold or too big to fit into the engine room.

So I am thinking of getting one made of grp I would rather know what they look like inside before I cut it open! Does anyone know? Is it empty, is there just a baffle, is it complicated? Help, please John. Originally Posted by steelfan. John, Here is a picture of one I removed from a Steel 43ft Cruiser Here is another picture showing the dimensions of a waterlock from 'Vetus' Take the metric measurements and divide by by Therefore it might be useful to consider replacing yours with a 'Vetus' Richard.

Hi John, Here is a picture showing how the 'Vetus' waterlock can be fitted to most situations : The upper and lower half can be swiveled so the that inlet and outlet pipes can be pointing in any direction. The pipes can also be swiveled to suit most configurations. The minimum size of waterlock needed can be calculated based on the volume of water your exhaust hose could hold that hose being between the waterlock and your boat's transom or where ever the exhaust exits the boat.

The concept is that if that hose were completely filled with seawater which all drained into your waterlock, none of it would back up into the engine. Then, when sizing, add a bit of size for "insurance" measure. Work in inches for length of hose and for diameter so you'll end up with cubic inches needed. Then, you can look at the size of various waterlocks to make sure they are larger than your minimum needed. I know many boats have waterlocks much smaller than the above calculation, but that is how we sized ours plus a bit of size for good measure.

The exhaust exits this pipe vertically, showers down into the cylinder which has another pipe "take off" at its bottom which goes to the exhaust thru-hull. One can fabricate a waterlock like this very easily. Modern waterlocks don't share this design, but that is the basic one and if you ever had to fabricate one in a third world country with no access to Vetus or other parts, you could.

Good luck! There is no try. Sorry about the bad description The unit for the Perkins is a vertical axis cylinder, Forums New posts Search forums. What's New New posts. Members Registered members Current visitors. Site Rules. Log in Register. Search titles only. Search Advanced search…. New posts. Search forums. Log in. JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Thread starter gmcman Start date Sep 2, To avoid confusion Idle is quiet, cruise is quiet, only thing I notice sound-wise is hard acceleration there is a slight rasp but not bad, just slightly louder than stock.

The bad I haven't spent too much time with it, need more miles but I have noticed a drop in MPG Acceleration seems slightly restrained when above 4K, Seems like it's restricted for sure. I am going to disconnect the resonator just to hopefully isolate the muffler and see if anything changes. Matches up perfectly with the factory hangers, very easy to change I will give it a few weeks to test the MPG though.

Is the Walker exhaust stainless like the OEM or is it aluminized steel like most replacements? Old system looked fine, why did you replace it?

Maintaining your Diesel Exhaust

Thanks Doug. Looks like a perfect fit with no backwards bends. Sucks you lost MPG, hopefully it picks up soon and you dont have to spend any more.JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. This item is currently unavailable from stock. If ordering with stock items, all backorder items will be shipped separately free of charge. The delivery date is estimated to the best of our ability, our customer support team will update you on delivery dates once your order has been placed if the estimated date changes.

Our range of Centek and Vetus waterlocks, designed to prevent water backflow to the engine in water cooled exhaust systems and provide noise deadening qualities.

Centek's Vernalift waterlock series are all made from GRP materials, like the rest of their wet exhaust products, due to the heat and corrosion resistant properties it possesses. The Vetus range of marine exhaust components are all made from plastic.

We can supply waterlocks with a wide range of port sizes, from 30mm up to mm. Our waterlocks also have different port configurations available:.

Telephone: Excl VAT. Menu Search. Quick Buy. Part Identifier. Help Centre. My Basket 0. You have no items in your basket. Login Register. Show Less Show More. Waterlock Mufflers. Delivery Information See examples and information on our shipping rates. Catalogue Request Get our catalogue delivered straight to your door.

Email Newsletter Subscribe for the latest offers, product news, technical advice and much more. This product has been added to your basket.Marine exhausts systems are an important and often overlooked part of a marine engine. Most vessels have a 'wet' exhaust system.

Salt water is injected at the riser - the outlet for exhaust from the exhaust manifold. This mixture of exhaust gas and water is then passed through a series of bends until it exits the boat, preferably at the stern. Exhaust gases mixed with salt water create a highly corrosive compound. This is why exhaust systems are commonly made using non-corrosive components such as nitrile rubber reinforced hose brown - not green - stripegalvanized steel, fiberglass or plastic.

how does a waterlock muffler work

The purpose of these components, which vary in size and shape depending on the engine size and layout of the engine room, is to prevent hydraulicing of the engine. This is caused when an engine has filled with salt water which has entered via the exhaust and can cause extensive damage if left for more than two hours.

Water enters the exhaust from wave action at stern and poor exhaust design.

how does a waterlock muffler work

In some ocean conditions, such as a following sea, water can be forced back up the exhaust when the engine is not running. With the engine full of water the engine cannot crank over as it is cannot compress water. You will know your engine is hydrauliced if it will not turn over - generally after a long sailing period - and you have removed the starter motor and ensured it works.

To remove water from inside the combustion chambers, first remove all injectors, crank engine over to blow water out, refit injectors, bleed injector lines, and start. Then leave motor running until exhaust sorted out. Check to see that the riser is not coked up or corroded - a common problem. If build up is excessive the riser will have to be removed to check the engine end of the pipe.

Coke can be scraped out to provide a short term fix although often the riser will have to be replaced. There are aftermarket systems which vary in quality. Make sure you fit the right design for the application. Ensure your water-lock is low enough and big enough to hold all the water in exhaust system. Is there a gooseneck or central vertical loop in the exhaust hose at the transom exit?

Is there a siphon break and is it functioning properly - no leaking valves? Exhaust gas is poisonous and can cause sea sickness and headaches. Replace any faulty parts immediately. Use double hose clamps on each joint or, preferably, super clamps, bolt style, and exhaust cement if need be. Hot sections should be lagged with fiberglass tape to prevent burns.

Beware of asbestos lagging. Many older vessels and marine engine installations had exhaust systems that were lagged with asbestos tape and rope. Asbestos sound-proofing was also common in older boats.

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